CHILLERS & HEAT EXCHANGERS

WHY USE CHILLERS & HEAT EXCHANGERS?

HEALTHY FERMENTATIONS DEPEND ON COOLING FACTORS | THE #1 KEY FOR AMAZING FLAVOUR IN YOUR "CRAFT BEER" IS TEMPERATURE

Temperature: Correct fermentation temp is yeast strain dependent. Ale yeast strains are typically fermented at 60-72° F, while Lagers are usually fermented at 45-60° F. As temperature increases, off-flavor production tends to increase. Fermenting below recommended temperatures can cause a stuck fermentation. Similarly, temperature fluctuation stresses yeast, leading to an increase in off flavors or stuck fermentations.

The process of healthy fermentation creates heat hence the use of PT100 temperature gauges in the thermal well of a fermentation vessel. The temperature is regulated by Chiller ensuring a great tasting brew. with no by-product protein offsets from  overheating our fermentation lock.

Oxygen, pitching rate, and temperature are the most important factors that influence fermentation success, though they are certainly not the only factors.

Oxygen: 8 – 12 ppm dissolved O2 is required for healthy Ale fermentation. Lager fermentations require up to 15 ppm. At atmospheric pressure, about 8 ppm is the maximum attainable O2 level in normal wort through shaking a fermenter. Diffusion of compressed air through a sintered stone achieves higher levels, and pure O2 pushed through a sintered stone is better still. Aeration at any point after fermentation begins is generally undesirable.

Pitching Rate: Ale fermentations require about 10 million cells/ml, lagers 15 million cells/ml, for normal strength wort, though pitching rate requirements increase with gravity. In a 5 gallon batch, using a “pitchable tube” or smack pack alone pretty much guarantee that you’ll under pitch. Make a starter to increase cell counts prior to pitching. For detailed information on making starters, visit www.mrmalty.com.

 The best way to safeguard your yeast is to bring it to temp with a Heat Exchanger.

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